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February Six...

National Institute of Health: The Charles R. Drew Papers

Topics: African Americans, Civil Rights, Education, Human Rights, Women's Rights

Carver College

For almost 74 years, Carver’s biblically based teaching has prepared servants of God to become pastors, missionaries, teachers, business professionals and church leaders to use God’s Word to reach the world and equip others.

In 1943, Rev. Solomon Randolph, an African-American pastor in Atlanta and others had been asking God to provide them with a place to study the Bible so that they could prepare for ministry. In response to their prayers, God brought Dr. Talmage and Mrs. Grace Payne to serve at His instruments to grant their petition.

Graduates of Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, Illinois, the Paynes first responded to God’s call to the mission field and served with China Inland Mission for sixteen years. While home on furlough, World War II began and the Paynes were unable to return to China.

Following the leading of the Holy Spirit, the Paynes set down roots in Atlanta, Georgia, and began to teach the Word of God to individuals living in urban Atlanta. Their work as evangelists was so successful that in the fall of 1943, the Paynes established the Carver Bible Institute, a Christian institution of higher learning named in honor of the great African-American scientist George Washington Carver.

Central State University

Central State University’s history begins with our parent institution Wilberforce University, named in honor of the great abolitionist William Wilberforce. Established at Tawawa Springs, Ohio in 1856, it is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church and is one of the oldest Black-administered institutions of higher education in the nation.

In 1887, the Ohio General Assembly enacted legislation that created a Combined Normal and Industrial Department at Wilberforce University. The objectives of this new state-sponsored department were to provide teacher training and vocational education, and to stabilize these programs by assuring a financial base similar to that of other state-supported institutions.

The statute establishing the Combined Normal and Industrial Department declared that the institution was “open to all applicants of good and moral character” thereby indicating no limitations as to race, color, sex, or creed. It was clear however, that the Department and its successors were designed to serve the educational needs of African-American students.

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU) is a private, nonprofit, community-founded, student-centered University committed to cultivating diverse health professional leaders who are dedicated to social justice and health equity for underserved populations through outstanding education, clinical service and community engagement. CDU is also a leader in health disparities research with a focus on education, training, treatment and care in cancer, diabetes, cardiometabolic and HIV/AIDS.

In the five decades since the school was incorporated in the Watts-Willowbrook area of Los Angeles in 1966, CDU has graduated more than 575 physicians, 1,200 physician assistants and over a thousand other health professionals, as well as training over 2,700 physician specialists through its sponsored residency programs. Its School of Nursing has graduated over 1000 nursing professionals, including more than 600 family nurse practitioners.

CDU has earned designation as a minority-serving institution by the U.S. Office for Civil Rights, and is recognized by the Department of Education (DOE) under Title III B as a Historically Black Graduate Institution (HBGI). The University is also a member of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities.

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science is named in honor of the brilliant African-American physician, famous for his pioneering work in blood preservation. The University, in its emphasis on service to the community, draws its inspiration from the life of Drew, whose short 46 years were full of achievements, learning and sharing of his knowledge to benefit mankind.

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

The founding of Cheyney University was made possible by Richard Humphreys, a Quaker philanthropist who bequeathed $10,000, one tenth of his estate, to design and establish a school to educate the descendants of the African race. Born on Tortola, an island in the West Indies, Richard Humphreys came to Philadelphia in 1764. Having witnessed the struggles of African Americans competing unsuccessfully for jobs due to the influx of immigrants, he became interested in their plight. In 1829, after race riots occurred in Philadelphia, Humphreys wrote his will and charged thirteen fellow Quakers to design an institution: “…to instruct the descendants of the African race in school learning, in the various branches of the mechanic arts, trades and agriculture, in order to prepare and fit and qualify them to act as teachers….”

From its initial founding until 1852, the African Institute, as it was known, was located on a 136 acre farm seven miles from Philadelphia on Old York Road. In 1849, the farm school closed for re-evaluation and the farm was sold. On October 22, 1849, the board authorized the re-opening of the school, and on November 5, 1849, an evening school opened on Barclay Street in Philadelphia where it continued to operate through the spring of 1851 until suitable quarters could be found to resume a day school program. Toward the end of July, 1851, the board found a better location for the school on two contiguous lots on the south side of Lombard Street (716-18). The purchase price was $3,244. The board authorized the purchase of the lots and directed the committee to prepare a plan for the building as soon as possible. When the school opened in 1852 as the Institute for Colored Youth, a foundation had been laid for many years until the Lombard building was sold and the school moved to a new building at 915 Bainbridge Street in 1866 where a Pennsylvania state historical marker now stands.
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