Howardena Pindell with her work “Autobiography: Artemis” (1986) at Garth Greenan Gallery in New York, Jan. 11, 2019. Howardena Pindell is seeking the return of almost two dozen works lent to the N’Namdi galleries for exhibition. Daniel Dorsa/The New York Times.

by Hilarie M. Sheets



 
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NEW YORK (NYT NEWS SERVICE).- For many African-American artists looking for gallery representation in the 1980s, George N’Namdi was the only game in town. One of the few black art dealers, then and now, N’Namdi opened his first gallery in Detroit in 1981 and focused on black artists working in abstraction. They had been largely ignored by the mainstream art world and marginalized, as well, within black communities that expected their artists to make socially and politically oriented work.

“We were basically considered traitors if we didn’t do specifically didactic work,” said Howardena Pindell, 77, a graduate of Yale University, who took her pioneering abstractions to the Studio Museum in the Harlem borough of New York City only to be told, she said, by the director in the 1970s to “go show your work with the white boys.” They weren’t knocking on her door, either.

N’Namdi offered opportunity. Pindell had eight solo exhibitions at his galleries in Michigan, Illinois and New York from 1987 to 2006. But by 2009, she had hired a lawyer to request the return of original works lent to the N’Namdi galleries for exhibition, with a long trail of correspondence over the next decade seeking information on the whereabouts and sales of her art. She now is claiming that N’Namdi, his son Jumaane and their related companies cheated her and profited off her vulnerability.

In a lawsuit touching on issues of race, loyalty and a lack of transparency in the art world, Pindell is seeking the return of 20 works of art from the N’Namdis, along with three works from a Texas-based collector, Arthur Primas, and punitive damages of “no less than” $500,000.

The lawsuit, filed in January in the Southern District of New York and amended April 21, alleges that “accounts of sales and inventory, if provided at all, were willfully misleading and inaccurate, payments were not timely if received at all, and the identity of purchasers, as required by law, was not provided.” The three works sold to Primas, according to the lawsuit, were “heavily discounted by the N’Namdi Defendants without the knowledge or authorization” of Pindell.

George and Jumaane N’Namdi said through their lawyer, Peter Raymond, “It is our intention to move to dismiss the claims.” Raymond repeated a statement published in ARTnews, which first reported the suit: “Our clients have great respect for Ms. Pindell as an artist and are proud to have been able to help her with her career.” However, he added, “they believe the claims in this lawsuit are meritless.”

Pindell is one of a growing number of black artists, including Jack Whitten, Al Loving, Ed Clark, Robert Colescott and Frank Bowling, who have lately seen a surge of attention from museums, collectors and critics after decades of neglect. They all exhibited early on with George N’Namdi. The complaint by Pindell intends to establish a long pattern of manipulation by the N’Namdis. In a case that could strengthen protections for artists, it alleges that Loving, Herbert Gentry and their estates also “publicly expressed their difficulties” with their galleries.

Pindell’s lawsuit asserts that similar complaints were made against the N’Namdi organization by Loving’s widow, Mara, after the artist’s death in 2005. (Loving settled her lawsuit in 2008.) Gentry died in 2003; his widow, Mary Anne Rose, declined to comment on the estate’s relationship with the N’Namdis.

Last week, two African-American artists who were represented by the N’Namdis in the past, James Little and Richard Mayhew, stepped forward to tell The New York Times about their own issues with the gallery.

Mayhew, who is 96, and the last living artist from the Spiral Group, a New York-based African-American artist collective formed during the civil rights struggle, described being approached by collectors who said they owned paintings by him. “And I had no idea,” he said, adding he was “shocked” to learn that the N’Namdi galleries had sold these works without his knowledge. “I wasn’t being paid for the paintings that were sold.”

“I wanted to sue,” Mayhew said, allowing that he could not afford to do so. “Many artists were reluctant to sue or didn’t know how to do it,” he added.

Mayhew finally severed his relationship with the gallery a decade ago.

According to Pindell’s complaint, “Discrimination in the art world prevented the recognition that these artists deserved until the last several years.” It alleges that “the N’Namdis took advantage of this situation by egregiously and systematically breaching their fiduciary obligations to [the plaintiff] and others.”

Pindell, Al Loving and other artists working with the N’Namdis did not have formal contracts, not unusual at the time; business in the art world was often done on a handshake. But Pindell’s lawyer, Barbara Hoffman, said in an interview that statutes in many states protect consigned works of art and “impose obligations on the dealer, including prompt payment, even if there is not a written contract.”

Pindell, whose work ranges from highly experimental mixed-media abstractions to figurative canvases dealing with autobiographical and political themes, was celebrated in a traveling retrospective that opened in 2018 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. She has been represented since 2014 by Garth Greenan in New York, and she now shows with Victoria Miro in London as well. The artist’s work today sells for up to $1 million, according to Greenan.

Several of the works she is trying to get back in the lawsuit have “increased in value tremendously,” Hoffman said.

Declining to comment specifically on the lawsuit, Pindell said she preferred to have her dealer, Greenan, speak for her.

“Howardena would say it’s particularly depressing because George N’Namdi was taking advantage of his own people, already in precarious positions,” Greenan said. “Justice would make her feel like she wasn’t taken for a ride for 20 years.”4725889295?profile=RESIZE_710x

 

 

Erika Alexander on Business

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmVcxfIdrMk&feature=youtu.be4036478202?profile=RESIZE_710x4036491986?profile=RESIZE_710xThe former Johnson Publishing Company was a poerful force of creaotivity, culture adn commerce. It financed the design and manufacture of its downtown CHicago office building.

Now forever lost due to its heris selling the building and giving away too many of its assets.  It unique art collection went up adn sold well at the Swann Galleries Auction in NY this year..generating more spending change for its heir.  But what of us...the people? Or the wellness of Black Culture?  What of it? Non-Blacks would never sell its assets to Blacks....never!

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As a full-time small business owner since 1981, I've long been a proponent of supporting artisans and shopping locally whenever possible. But when I began researching to prepare for a blog post about why shopping small is so important, I was incredibly encouraged to unearth this data.

  • Seventy-seven million Americans are employed by small business. That’s 2 out of every 3 private sector jobs in the United States. According to the SBA, small businesses have created 66% of all new jobs since 1995.
  • Every $10million of spending at a local company creates 57 jobs while that same spending at Amazon creates just 14 jobs.
  • According to the SBA, big businesses have eliminated 4 million jobs since 1990, while small businesses added 8 million jobs within that same time period.
  • A series of studies by the research firm Civic Economics found that 48 percent of purchases at local independent businesses go right back into the community, compared to less than 14 percent of sales made at chain stores. 

Three cheers for small businesses! Want to dig deeper? I published a blog post late last year which makes a strong case for the power and importance of small businesses. I'm putting it back on your radar because it's highly share-able and makes a compelling case for shopping small this season.

 

READ MORE ABOUT WHY SMALL BUSINESSES MATTER >>

3742344533?profile=RESIZE_710x3557455017?profile=RESIZE_710x1887623178?profile=RESIZE_710x3742349639?profile=RESIZE_710x3742340811?profile=RESIZE_710x

 

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/09/racial-wealth-gap-history-slavery-black-white-family-income/597100/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

The above is a link covering research on the mass cross generational theft of Black wealth.  Now I pose, add this to how Blacks avoid doing business too many times with Blacks and have little to no patience, love or insights about what is at stake when buying Manga, Made in Japan, Made In China or Made In Korea. At least Made in the USA includes Blacks earning and saving.  How many Blacks do we ever see working in a business owned by Chinese.......

 

 

 
 
The above link toTheaster Gates on rebuilding community;

2807486195?profile=RESIZE_710x Japanese or Koreans?

 

Remove our insistance on thug-life, crime and violence as cultural and social expressions, Blacks would then create a setting to grow wealth. If not, once given, reparations will simply end up in CHina, Japan and Korea....and back to the hiers of slavers.  Plan to succeed or plan to fail....again.

 

Dealing in Black Money means to support and brag about a legal honest well run Black owned business.  Not only talking about the poorly run ones. 

 

 2437878391?profile=RESIZE_710x

 3742340811?profile=RESIZE_710x

Black buying power in the USA is now over 1.5 trillion dollars:

The goal of this group is to manifest the Principles of Kwanzaa into an every day practice with Blacks buying products and services from other Blacks as a casual act instead of a forced, rare  or awkward practice. This will grow power, prestige and more money!

Being Black should not be a reason to not buy from another Black!.

 

Black profits matter!  End the Balck On Black Boycott of legal honest businesses & professionals and prosper!

 

Negative folks are invited to not be a part of this group. Spend your money and time in your beloved "mainstream!". This is about our DREAM!

29 Members
Join Us!

Borrow $5,000, repay $42,000 - How super high-interest loans have boomed in California By ANDREW KHOURI and JAMES RUFUS KOREN JAN 19, 2018 JoAnn Hesson, sick with diabetes for years, was desperate. After medical bills for a leg amputation and kidney transplant wiped out most of her retirement nest egg, she found that her Social Security and small pension weren't enough to make ends meet. As the Marine Corps veteran waited for approval for a special pension from the Department of Veterans Affairs, she racked up debt with a series of increasingly pricey online loans. In May 2015, the Rancho Santa Margarita resident borrowed $5,125 from Anaheim lender LoanMe at the eye-popping annual interest rate of 116%. The following month, she borrowed $2,501 from Ohio firm Cash Central at an even higher APR: 183%. "I don't consider myself a dumb person," said Hesson, 68. "I knew the rates were high, but I did it out of desperation." Not long ago, personal loans of this size with sky-high interest rates were nearly unheard of in California. But over the last decade, they've exploded in popularity as struggling households - typically with poor credit scores - have found a new source of quick cash from an emerging class of online lenders. Unlike payday loans, which can carry even higher annual percentage rates but are capped in California at $300 and are designed to be paid off in a matter of weeks, installment loans are typically for several thousand dollars and structured to be repaid over a year or more. The end result is a loan that can cost many times the amount borrowed. Hesson's $5,125 loan was scheduled to be repaid over more than seven years, with $495 due monthly, for a total of $42,099.85 - that's nearly $37,000 in interest.

The Worst Cities For Black Americans
By Samuel Stebbins and Evan Comen
15. Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI
> Black population: 1.6 million (16.9%)
> Black median income: $36,017 (47.3% of white income)
> Unemployment: 18.7% black; 5.8% white
> Homeownership rate: 39.9% black; 74.6% white

A history of exclusionary zoning, redlining, and discriminatory lending practices in Chicago throughout the 20th century has led to deeply entrenched segregation in the Midwestern metropolis and contributed to some of the largest racial disparities in income, education, and health of any U.S. metro area. While nationwide the typical black household earns 60.1% of the income the typical white household earns, in Chicago the typical black household earns just 47.3% of the typical white household's income. Just 21.3% of black adults in Chicago have a college degree, less than half the 43.7% of white adults with a degree. Additionally, the black unemployment rate is more than three times the white unemployment rate.
Link About Islam & SlaveryWhy is it so challenging to deal in legal Black-Money?Artist Call for Entries- due June 29
2018 Black Heritage Through Visual Rhythms Juried Art Show

The National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center (NAAMCC), the Ohio History Connection (OHC), The King Arts Complex Columbus, and the African American Visual Artists Guild (AAVAG) are presenting the fifth annual Black Heritage Through Visual Rhythms National Juried Art Show. Artists from across the United States are invited to submit their work to the juried art exhibit in the new categories updated for this year: Best of Show; Social Justice; Identity; and Surroundings (includes still life and landscape). The show is open to all artists, however, all submissions should emphasize themes and perspectives related to the African diaspora and/or African American culture, history or experience.

Winning prizes:
Best of Show: $3,000.00
1st Place- Surroundings: $1,000.00
1st Place- Identity: $1,000.00
1st Place- Social Justice: $1,000.00
 National Eat at a 
Black Coffee Shop Day
Tuesday, May 29, 2018

 
Chicago - After the recent Starbucks incident involving the arrest of two Black men in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, most Black people had one of two responses: either boycott Starbucks or open our own coffee shops.
National Eat at a Black Coffee Shop Day combines the best of these ideas. On Tuesday, May 29, 2018, tens of thousands of Starbucks customers will try a new coffee experience at a Black-owned coffee shop.
Black coffee houses, coffee shops and tea houses, under the umbrella of The Black Star Project, have formed a federation to flex their collective and connective muscle in the competitive coffee marketplace. They are working together to get out the word that their coffees are just as good, or better, than Starbucks.
These Black coffee houses expect to win significant market share on Tuesday, May 29th because that day Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. units for diversity training.
Black Dollars Circulate in Black Communities for 6 Hours

The dollar circulates in: 
Asian communities for 28 days
Jewish communities 20 days
White communities 17 da

The World- Since the launch of the growing Black Age of Comics genre in 1993 the tension between the mainstream and this dream has resulted in many an amazing expression. None are more vital than the two historic "BLACK COMIX" mega sized anthology album books that feature the works , stories, backgrounds and information about the seriously gifted and dedicated sisters & brothers who make it so. there is even a listing of all of the indie annual events that facilitate this movement. 1993 officially put the "Black" in this hybrid of visual & literary art. Now your collections, libraries, living rooms, media centers, classes and companies can better get their Black on! "Indie today: Black Age Forever"! "Black Comix Returns" by Damian Duffy & John Jennings per Lion Forge/The Magnetic Collection.....via Amazon.This is not personal, sexual or social.  It is about the power grown when dealing in legal Black-Money!This Limited edition Black Panther statue is about the same height as the Academy Award "Oscar".  Except you can not buy as "Oscar". Prof. Onli is auctioning off the BP icon.  Started at 4250.00 now the "floor asking rate" is $1,500.00.Blacks in America have about a $1.3 trillion gross national income.  Only 2% of that money, about $26 billion, is re-circulated in the Black community. 

The Retirement Crisis Facing African Americans 
By Rodney Brooks, Next Avenue Contributor 
March 9, 2017

 

There's a saying: When white America catches a cold, black America catches pneumonia. So, if there is an impending retirement crisis in America, what does that mean for African Americans? The answer to that question is discouraging.
There is a huge gap in retirement preparation of African Americans compared to white Americans, generally speaking. According to the Urban Institute's Nine charts about wealth inequality in America:

 

African Americans Tend Not to Invest in Stocks

 

Some analysts also say that African Americans often shy away from investing in the stock market. "Whatever discretionary income we have, we tend not to invest in equities," says Rockeymoore. "We don't have a diversification."

 

This may be due to a lack of comfort with the stock market.  "African Americans are risk-averse," says Deborah Owens, a former Fidelity Investments vice president who calls herself America's Wealth Coach. "So, one of the major reasons they have less in retirement savings is they are ultra-conservative, particularly African Americans who work in the public sector and nonprofit organizations."
 
Owens says black investors typically focus on guaranteed or fixed investments that are low-risk or no-risk. As a result, their retirement funds aren't compounding at a high rate of return.

 

According to the Federal Reserve, the average balance of African Americans in 401(k)s is only $23,000. And Social Security and the Racial Gap in Retirement Wealth found the average balance for African Americans in pensions and IRAs was $10,300, vs. $105,600 for white Americans.

 

Owens believes many African American workers don't take full advantage of all the choices in their employer-sponsored plans because they don't understand them. "The tendency to be risk averse is directly correlated to their lack of knowledge," she says.
 

 

What Employers and Policymakers Could Do to Help


James Brewer, president of Envision Wealth Planning in Chicago and president of the Association of African American Financial Advisors says African Americans need financial advice on issues such as having higher student loan debt than white counterparts and, often, a greater need to financially assist less affluent family members. Maya Rockeymoore, President of Center for Global Policy Solutions in Washington, D.C. says African Americans, even in retirement, tend to support other family members, including children and adult children. Also, they are disproportionately taking care of grandchildren, making them unable to save more for retirement.

All in all, says Rockeymoore: "There needs to be a national campaign to encourage young African Americans to save and invest. Home ownership is the pathway to wealth. They [blacks] need to be educated in the homebuying process and also to diversify their investments to include stocks and bonds."

 

  
Borrow $5,000, repay $42,000 - How super high-interest loans have boomed in California
 
By ANDREW KHOURI and JAMES RUFUS KOREN
JAN 19, 2018
JoAnn Hesson, sick with diabetes for years, was desperate.
After medical bills for a leg amputation and kidney transplant wiped out most of her retirement nest egg, she found that her Social Security and small pension weren't enough to make ends meet.
As the Marine Corps veteran waited for approval for a special pension from the Department of Veterans Affairs, she racked up debt with a series of increasingly pricey online loans.

In May 2015, the Rancho Santa Margarita resident borrowed $5,125 from Anaheim lender LoanMe at the eye-popping annual interest rate of 116%. The following month, she borrowed $2,501 from Ohio firm Cash Central at an even higher APR: 183%.
"I don't consider myself a dumb person," said Hesson, 68. "I knew the rates were high, but I did it out of desperation."  Not long ago, personal loans of this size with sky-high interest rates were nearly unheard of in California. But over the last decade, they've exploded in popularity as struggling households - typically with poor credit scores - have found a new source of quick cash from an emerging class of online lenders.

 

Unlike payday loans, which can carry even higher annual percentage rates but are capped in California at $300 and are designed to be paid off in a matter of weeks, installment loans are typically for several thousand dollars and structured to be repaid over a year or more. The end result is a loan that can cost many times the amount borrowed.  Hesson's $5,125 loan was scheduled to be repaid over more than seven years, with $495 due monthly, for a total of $42,099.85 - that's nearly $37,000 in interest.

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